Lilly Branch Outfalls

On February 9, 2016 students from Dr. Brickman's honor biology course ventured out to East Campus, just beyond the Lamar Dodd School of Art to learn how to identify and inspect outfall locations. Outfalls are the end of a municipality's storm-water management system. For most smaller cities and rural areas, this signifies the point at which untreated storm-water arrives into our natural systems. For Lilly Branch, one of four watersheds on campus, these outfall locations are all around East Campus. Ania Truszczynski from Athens-Clarke County's Stormwater Management Division led the instruction by walking students along the stream and identifying surrounding outfalls. 

 Outfalls are meant to pipe stormwater, so seeing running water at an outfall location 72 hours after the last rain event indicates some break or entry by another source. If a leak like such is seen and reported (by calling or emailing ACC Stormwater Management) , a water sample is collected for testing of contaminants including Fecal coliform and E. Coli. Outfalls may also be characterized by what is and is not around them. An outfall with a significant sediment load surrounding the pipe indicates it may be receiving too much sediment and could cause clogging. If clogged, storm-water may build up until it is flushed in a manner that could cause detriment to the adjacent banks. Also, large rocks around outfall points are meant to slow incoming stormwater flushes, so the location of this riprap zone may indicate the power of stormwater flows to move these rocks further away. 

Lilly Branch Cyanotype Mural Project
Lilly Branch Cyanotype Mural Project
Lilly Branch Cyanotype Mural Project
Lilly Branch Cyanotype Mural Project
Lilly Branch Cyanotype Mural Project